The team is joined by Guest Kats Rosie Burbidge, Stephen Jones, Mathilde Pavis, and Eibhlin Vardy, and by InternKats Verónica Rodríguez Arguijo, Hayleigh Bosher, Tian Lu and Cecilia Sbrolli.

Tuesday, 14 November 2017

Around the IP Blogs!

Let's put the witch costume binoculars on to check out what the IP blogosphere was spooking talking about around Halloween time!

Spooking mood
Focussing our lenses on patents, these are interesting times for SPCs jurisprudence, based on Tenofovir - the Swiss Bundespatentgericht goes for the infringement test, which did not adopt the CJEU approach, as  Siegfried Grimm reported for the SPC Blog. What is even more interesting is that the same case is pending before the CJEU...the suspense increases!

The recommendation regarding copyright reform has been at the center of  discussion. The Kluwer Copyright Blog proposes an executive summary of The Recommendation on Measures to Safeguard Fundamental Rights and the Open Internet in the Framework of the EU Copyright Reform,  while Eleonora Rosati comments on the CEIPI Opinion on copyright limitations' reform in the European Digital Single Market for the 1709 Blog.

After some slanderous comments made on a blog, the Colombian Constitutional Court mandates Google to eliminate a blog from its platform Blogger. Florelia Vallejo Trujillo reports on the case for the IPTango Blog.

Still talking about illegal content online, Sophie Stalla-Bourdillon of the peep beep! Blog discusses the issue of The EU approach to content regulation online bis: tackling (il)legal content online with real-world identities?

From recommendation on the copyright reform to the Digital Single Market Strategy to the GDPR, Stephen Brett of IPDraughts asks himself how Using personal data in research: all change….?....after the GDPR comes into force?

Still licking our Halloween chops, it's only fair to mention chocolate. In Bundesgerichtshof: It is not over yet for the packet in the pocket, Christian Tenkhoff of the Marques Blog unwraps the case which saw the Federal Court of Justice holding that “the squared shape of the chocolate did not constitute an essential functional characteristic of chocolate”. Chocolate. Will. Prevail.

Moving on to rice, Friso Onderdelinden for the Kluwer Trademark Blog has published a comment on the curious decision of the Dutch District Court of the Hague which held that there is No likelihood of confusion between SINA rice and SITA rice; the relevant public has a background in Islamic cultures.

Talking about a different SITA, AfroHip of the Afro-IP Blog takes us to the shores of the Gulf of Guinea to tell us about Ghana taking strides and about the importance vested in the need for a strong IP system for the country.

Image credits: Susan Larson


4 comments:

THE US anon said...

This is seriously accelerating in the wrong direction (feudal systems and semblances of guild mentality should NOT be encouraged).

Cecilia Sbrolli said...

Thank you for your comment, THE US anon, although I am not entirely sure to what exactly you are referring. Could you elaborate? Thank you!

THE US anon said...

My apologies - this comment belongs on the "How far away is global trade secrets protection?" thread.

Kant said...

At a guess, US anon was referring to the article directly below on the IPIB.

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